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Are the horseshoes made of gold?


FHOTD recently did a blog post on horses available for $350.  We thought we’d go in the opposite direction and see what’s out there for around $35,000.  We’ve come to the conclusion that some people are extremely out of touch with reality!

Ad Text:

“EXCELLENT BREEDING in this spectacular Hanoverian Dark Bay Mare by Popeye K. Born 2002. Currently showing baby green hunters. Amazing jump. Lovely movement. Beautiful animal. Top hunter prospect. Very athletic. $35,000”

We’d love to provide a picture to go with that ad but, alas, it was text only.  That’s right – they expect you to pay 35 grand for their “spectacular” creature, but apparently her height is irrelevant and they’re too cheap to spring for a photo ad…

So we’ll snark blindly!

Baby green hunters is just that – hunters for the young’uns.  It’s about 2’3″, 2’6″ max.   This is a 9 year old with the education of a 4 or 5 year old!  Also note that there is no mention of her winning the baby greens.  For all that they claim she’s excellent/spectacular/amazing/lovely/beautiful/athletic, what do you want to bet that the showing hasn’t been particularly successful?  Maybe they should spend less time searching the thesaurus for synonyms of “great” and more time actually schooling the mare!

—–

Great Gaits.dressage Prspect.beautiful Neck AND Face

$40,000

I suspect that this is actually quite a nice horse.  There’s a short video which shows him moving well, and the full ad text lists some reasonably impressive accomplishments.  So why, oh why, could they not create a better ad?

He’s owned by a large breeding farm with facilities in multiple countries.  You’d think they would have someone to proofread!  What is with the weird random punctuation and capitalization?  Did the writer find it shocking that a horse would have both a beautiful neck AND face?  And why is that emphasized in the ad?  I don’t know about you, but when I’m looking to drop $40k on a horse, I’m looking for talent!

Plus, the only photo is this shot of him careening around on the longe line.  There’s nothing to judge his conformation from and if I had to base my opinion of his movement on this pic, I would assume he was half Andalusian and half motorcycle.  But at least he has ribbons in his hair!  That’s what really matters, right? (Or maybe they’re there to distract you from the motorcycle-ness. vroom vroom)

—–

Cruise Control aka C.C. is a beautiful 16.1+ H Warmblood Gelding. He is 3/4ths Thoroughbred 1/4 Shire. He has lead changes in both directions but needs some more time till they’re 100% consistent. He has a beautiful jump and very comfortable gates. He would be perfect for someone looking to excel in dressage, hunters and jumpers.

$30,000

Draft crosses can be excellent horses.  We’ve got nothing against them.  But when we click on an ad for a $30k Warmblood we expect to see a damn Warmblood, not a partial Shire!

Of course, we also expect to see a horse who’s able to carry himself in a proper frame, instead of going around inverted with his nose poking out.  Or one with flashy, athletic “gates”, if a high level of training isn’t the reason for the price.  Maybe we’re just crazy picky…

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About snarkyrider

We're snarktastic

Posted on August 19, 2011, in Bad Horse Ads and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. I found humor in your post on the $35k horses but I might find it a little more credible if you listed where the ads came from, not the url, just where. It is entirely the first mare is worth her price but the owners have fallen into financial problems; training and showing is very expensive and it might not have been possible for them to pursue that course, and advertising in certain sporthorse venues can be quite spendy even just for text. It is also possible they don’t have a super picture of the mare and a bad photo is far worst than no photo! My irritation with the ad is lack of height, lack of breeding approval and whether she is actually AHA, that can make a huge difference.

    Oh, and technically the last horse is a true WB; coldblood (shire) + hotblood (TB) = warmblood. What he is not is a european WB and that is what most people think of for WBs. A $30k horse, no. A $8k horse, maybe. He looks fairly safe and sane. My biggest pet peeve is that most dressage horses have different movement than hunters and people just don’t grasp that!

    I look forward to reading this blog more and seeing what you girls come up with!

    • We appreciate the feedback! Agree with many of your comments – we did actually snark on the lack of height in that first ad! And for those that are curious, the mare can be found on horsejournals.com/horsesforsale, and the other two were located on equinenow.com.

      And as far as the WB comment is concerned, I would agree if they hadn’t capitalized the word. After all, the majority of horses fall under the type warmblood, it’s nothing worth mentioning. The drafts (coldbloods) and the TBs/Arabs/Barbs (hotbloods), are the exceptions. When you say Warmblood, it implies the horse is an actual WB breed, as opposed to just being the general type. IMO.

  2. Thank you for a great post.

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